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Concert 1

Concert 1 Program

Kyle Johnson : I'm not really much of a talker
Kyle Johnson, live electronics

Mark Zanter : Racket (2017)
Mark Zanter, electric guitar

Ted Moore : feedback viii
Ted Moore, no-input mixer & eurorack synthesizer
Kyle Hutchins, feedback saxophone

Alex Christie & Kittie Cooper : Scan Site 1
Alex Christie, electronics
Kitties Cooper, electric guitar

Steven Kemper : Teka-Mori
Aurie Hsu, dancer

Carolyn Borcherding : Life is
Justin Massey, baritone saxophone

Paul Thomas : Skeuomorph no. 2
Paul Thomas, accordion

Brian Sears : TREMENDOUS!!
Derek Emch, Bass Clarinet
Henrique Batista, Marimba

Eric Lyon : Loose Canon
Kyle Hutchins, tenor saxophone

Ben Robichaux : Electronics Etude No. 2 - Swing Reflections
Christopher Williams, viola

Notes

Kyle Johnson : I'm not really much of a talker
I'm not really much of a talker is not based on a true story. The collection of multimedia-theater songs about lies, narrative, fiction and reality is performed live by Kyle Johnson with video and audio accompaniment.
During performance, I perform an original text onstage next to a large television or projection screen playing coordinated images and sound. Some songs tell stories, some are beautifully abstract and wordless, some are documentary pieces about real people, some connect to form larger sections while some are independent. Across the performance of the entire piece the perspective of the audience is constantly shifting, wondering how one part of the story connects to the other, what is fiction and what is fact, and what will come next.
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Mark Zanter : Racket (2017)
Racket (2017) for electric guitar, live processing and live video, explores/maps physical gestures that are tropes of electric guitar performance using them to generate musical events, explore pure sonic content in varied musical contexts, and find potential meanings intentional or accidental—to throw light upon their interpretation in social contexts.
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Alex Christie & Kittie Cooper : Scan Site 1
A “spirit box” is a tool used by ghost hunters to communicate with the deceased and other paranormal entities. The box sweeps through radio frequencies and outputs a garble of static, words, and other raw sound, inviting users to recompose these fragments into meaningful phrases. The idea is that the spirit box allows spirits to speak in the world of the living.
The spirit box enables us to find meaning in noise. It is a site-specific tool, using only the audio broadcast in its present location. Scan Site 1 also communicates through noise: the performers and spirit box input noise into the processing system. The guitar, electronics, and box interfere, modulate, and support each other, speaking together in order to express new meaning.
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Steven Kemper : Teka-Mori
Teka-Mori, for belly dancer, Remote electroAcoustic Kinesthetic Sensing (RAKS) system, and computer-generated sound, features an interactive, bi-directional relationship between movement and music that connects choreographic gestures and sonic outcomes. Teka refers to the vocalization of two different drum strokes on a doumbek. Mori, adapted from the Latin phrase memento mori, evokes the idea of lifelessness and decay. The piece conveys a dystopian, “broken-machine” aesthetic through noisy, distorted sonic materials. The choreography in Teka-Mori is rooted in belly dance, which originated in the U.S., but is derivative of Raqs Sharqi (Middle Eastern dance). Controlled torso and hip isolations and upper and lower body layering are a few characteristics of the movement vocabulary. The RAKS system is a wearable wireless sensor interface designed specifically for belly dance movement, consisting of a flex sensor, accelerometer, and programmable LEDs.
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Carolyn Borcherding : Life is
"The smallest moments.
The things we often miss.

The sound of water splashing in a fountain on a quiet morning.
The whisper of traffic in the distance.

Falling prey to an afternoon catnap.
Breathing in the scent of some nostalgic place.
Catching sight of a friend for the first time after a long absence.

A heavy pang of loneliness in the evening.
A brave smile from a grieving friend.
Sharing a hug,
A letter,
A joke.
Offering a few words of encouragement,
However small they may seem.

These small moments of both ups and downs give us depth in our humanity. They relate us in inexorable ways and create the human experience. They are quiet, fleeting, and precious."
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Paul Thomas : Skeuomorph no. 2
Skeuomorph no. 2 is one piece of a series of works for a variety of instrument/s and computer. A skeuomorph is an object that imitates the design of a similar artifact made from another material. Skeuomorphic design, particularly in graphical user interfaces, enables users to more easily interact with new technology by imitating familiar physical objects. The series of Skeuomorph pieces considers musical elements such as clear rhythmic pulse and moments of tonality skeuomorphically in order to invite the listener to newer and unfamiliar sound worlds.
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Brian Sears : TREMENDOUS!!
This is the best piece. No other piece has ever been as great as this piece. This piece has all the best notes, written by the best people, everyone knows that there has never been a piece like this in the history of the world, ever. Believe me, this piece is the smartest piece, and knows all the best people. Anyone who says this piece isn’t the best piece, is being fake. SAD!
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Eric Lyon : Loose Canon
Loose Canon is an articulated noise composition for improvising performer. Noise builds temporal structures of improvisatory guidance, and assembles DSP configurations for the live processing of the performer. In addition to the live performer, a second “ghost” performer is assembled from samples recorded earlier in the improvisation, and is then sent through further random DSP processing. The highly contingent and immediate nature of the software interface prevents the performer from comprehending the large-scale form, but could inspire the performer’s playing with the intensity of the computer-improvised enhancements, creating a sense of surprise and apprehension.
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Ben Robichaux : Electronics Etude No. 2 - Swing Reflections
Electronic Etude No. 2 – Swing Reflections is a piece that explores the subtleties of live delay and panning manipulations. These manipulations are coupled with harmonies and rhythms that can be associated with jazz and/or blues. The resulting aesthetic is one of interpersonal conflict. The harmonies imply a sense of relaxation and comfort, but the trajectory of the electronics coupled with the trajectory of the development of the musical materials conveys panic. The dissonance between the harmony and the development in the piece, both acoustic and electronic, creates a reflective, almost dream-like environment. Whether or not the dream in question is good or bad is entirely up to the listener. Electronic Etude No. 2 is the second in a series of pieces for solo instrument and live electronics aimed at exploring certain, often basic, electronic manipulations. This work was commissioned by my friend Christopher C. Williams.
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Bios

Mark Zanter, has appeared on NPR’s Live at the Landmark, WILL, IPR, on WVPN In Touch With The Arts, is published by Les Productions d’OZ, Schott European American and MJIC, and his works have been performed nationally and internationally at festivals including, MUSIC X, June in Buffalo, Soundscape, NYCEMF, Echofluxx14, SEAMUS, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Seensound. Zanter has received awards from ASCAP, AMC, ACF, Meet the Composer, WV Division Culture, WVMTA; and Lament and dream received special distinction for the ASCAP Rudolph Nissim Prize. He records for Ablaze, Navona, and innova record labels. Dr. Zanter is professor of music; and Distinguished Artist and Scholar at Marshall University.
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Alex Christie makes acoustic music, electronic music, and intermedia art in many forms. His work has been called “vibrant”, “interesting, I guess”, and responsible for “ruin[ing] my day”. He is particularly interested in the design of power structures, systems of interference, and absurdist bureaucracy. He is currently based in Charlottesville, Virginia. Alex’s work explores the ecology of performance in intermedia art and interactive electronic music. Through real-time audio processing, instrument building, light, video, and theater, Alex expands performance environments to offer multiple lenses through which the audience can experience the work. Alex has performed and presented at a variety of conferences and festivals whose acronyms combine to spell nicedinsaucesfeemmmmmogscabsplot. He holds degrees from the Oberlin Conservatory and Mills College and is currently pursuing a PhD in Composition and Computer Technologies (CCT) at the University of Virginia as a Jefferson Fellow. Other interests include baseball and geometric shapes.
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Kittie Cooper is a composer, performer, and educator based in Charlottesville, Virginia. She makes art that incorporates feminism and explores the spectrum between silliness and seriousness. Her work has been called "highly original and wonderfully fun". She is interested in text and graphic scores, improvisation, and DIY electronic instruments. During the year, Kittie teaches English and Language Arts at the Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind. She holds a Bachelor in Music from Northwestern University in music education and classical guitar performance, and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in special education at James Madison University. In her spare time, she enjoys taking care of the stray cats in her neighborhood.
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Ted Moore is a composer, improviser, intermedia artist, and educator based in Chicago. His work focuses on fusing the sonic, visual, physical, and acoustic aspects of performance and sound, often through the integration of technology. Ted’s work has been premiered by the International Contemporary Ensemble, Spektral Quartet, The Dream Songs Project, Yarn/Wire, Splinter Reeds, Quince Vocal Ensemble, ad others, and has been performed across the country including at The Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), Spectrum (NYC), and Root Signals Electronic Music Festival (Statesboro, GA), among others. Ted also frequently performs solo on electronics using his laptop, modular synthesizer systems, resonant physical objects, lighting equipment, and video projection. Currently Ted is pursuing a PhD in Music Composition at the University of Chicago.
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Praised for his “formidable technique” and “enviable uniformity of tone” (The Saxophone Symposium) and described as a “skilled improviser, no doubt about it” (I Care If You Listen), Jeffery Kyle Hutchins is a concert saxophonist, chamber musician, improviser, pedagogue, and performance artist who focuses on the creation and promotion of contemporary music and interdisciplinary media. His work emphasizes close collaboration with composers and artists to create adventurous programming, often incorporating the body, the voice, the instrument, technology, and space. He has performed concerts in Asia, Europe, and North America, and has participated in the creation of more than 100 new works. Jeffery Kyle Hutchins is a Yamaha Performing Artist, E. Rousseau Mouthpiece Artist, and Légère Artist.
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Steven Kemper is a composer, music technologist, and instrument designer. As a composer, Steven creates music for acoustic instruments, instruments and computers, musical robots, dance and video. Steven has received awards for his music from the Ammerman Center for Arts and Technology, Meet the Composer, the Danish Arts Council, and the International Computer Music Association. His first album, Mythical Spaces, was released by Ravello Records in 2018. Steven is a co-founder of Expressive Machines Musical Instruments, a collective dedicated to creating and composing music for robotic instruments. He also co-developed the RAKS (Remote electroAcoustic Kinesthetic Sensing) System, a wireless sensor interface designed specifically for belly dancers with composer and dancer Aurie Hsu. Steven’s research has been presented at NIME, ICMC, and MOCO, and published in Leonardo and Organised Sound. Steven is currently Assistant Professor of Music Technology and Composition at the Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University.
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Aurie Hsu (www.auriehsu.com) is a composer, pianist, and dancer. She performs with the Remote electroAcoustic Kinesthetic Sensing (RAKS) system, a wireless sensor interface for belly dance developed with composer Steven Kemper. Aurie has presented at NIME, ICMC, MOCO, SEAMUS, SIGCHI, Pixelerations, Third Practice Festival, the Logos Foundation, and the Cité International des Arts. Aurie received a Ph.D. in composition and computer technologies from the University of Virginia and holds degrees from Mills College and Oberlin Conservatory. She is an Assistant Professor in Technology in Music and Related Arts (TIMARA) at the Oberlin Conservatory.


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Carolyn Borcherding is a Graduate Assistant at the University of Illinois pursuing a doctoral degree in music composition. Her compositional interests involve exploring the potential musical relationships between acoustic instruments and electronics, and experimenting with the creation of space in fixed media works. She has had works performed at SEAMUS, the Electroacoustic Barn Dance, Electronic Music Midwest, SPLICE Institute, and others. Carolyn received her Master’s in Music Composition at Western Michigan University where she studied with Dr. Christopher Biggs and Dr. Lisa Coons.
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Canadian saxophonist Justin Massey an interpreter of contemporary music currently based in West Virginia. An advocate for new music, Justin presents music of his generation in all his performances by commissioning new repertoire and collaborating closely with composers to create new sonorities and textures, often through electronic manipulation of the saxophone. In the past concert season, Justin has presented new works for saxophone at festivals and conferences in the United States, Canada, and Europe including SEAMUS, BEAMS, SPLICE! Fest, the North American Saxophone Alliance Biennial Conference, Matera Intermedia Festival, the Marshall University New Music Festival, the West Fork New Music Festival, and the Ensemble Evolution residency at the Banff Creative Arts Centre. Justin has received awards from the University of Alberta, the Government of Alberta, and West Virginia University. He is a multi-year recipient of the Winspear Fund Scholarship and the Friends of the Anne Burrows Music Foundation Scholarship. Justin-Massey.com
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Paul David Thomas is an assistant professor and coordinator of music theory and composition at Texas Woman’s University in Denton, TX. Paul's acoustic and electronic music has been presented at venues, conferences, and festivals throughout the United States and Europe. He has special interest in writing for performer and electronics, group improvisation, and choral ensembles of all skill levels. Additionally, Paul is an active new music performer, regularly performing his own works for accordion and computer. Originally from northeastern Ohio, Paul holds degrees in composition from Bowling Green State University (MM) and the University of North Texas (PhD). Paul's choral music is published through Hal Leonard, Carl Fischer, and BriLee Press.
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Composer Brian Sears’s music is based on his attraction to timbre, space, and texture, and is heavily influenced by the concept of augmenting reality through the use of technology. His compositions utilize these forces as a foundation for creating immersive sonic environments that communicate intimate and emotional connections. Brian holds a Master’s degree from Bowling Green State University, and a Bachelor’s degree from San Jose State University, and is currently pursuing his PhD in Composition & Theory at Brandeis University where he studies with Eric Chasalow, Yu-Hui Chang, and David Rakowski. Brian is continually inspired and influenced by his interactions and collaborations with performers and sound artists, as well as past teachers and mentors like Elainie Lillios, Mikel Kuehn, Pablo Furman, and Brian Belet. These interactions have had a huge impact on his work, leading Brian to be a vocal proponent for the importance of community and collaboration in the new music world.
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Eric Lyon’s work focuses on articulated noise, chaos music, spatial orchestration, and computer chamber music. His software includes FFTease and LyonPotpourri, collections of externals for Max/MSP and Pd. He authored “Designing Audio Objects for Max/MSP and Pd.” His music has been recognized with a Giga-Hertz prize, MUSLAB, League ISCM World Music Days, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2017 he edited two issues of the Computer Music Journal, devoted to the topic of high-density loudspeaker arrays. Lyon has composed for such artists as Sarah Plum, Margaret Lancaster, The Noise Quartet, Ensemble mise-en, String Noise, The Crash Ensemble, Esther Lamneck, Kathleen Supové, Marianne Gythfeldt, and Seth Parker Woods. Lyon has taught computer music at Keio University, IAMAS, Dartmouth College, Manchester University, and Queen’s University Belfast. Lyon teaches in the School of Performing Arts at Virginia Tech, and is a faculty fellow at the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology.
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Ben Robichaux (b.1991) is a dedicated composer whose interest for expanding his compositional style has always been a top priority. His compositions include works for orchestra, wind ensemble, choir, string quartet, solo piano, electronics, and several chamber ensemble combinations. His chamber works have been featured at the SEAMUS 2018 National Conference, the 2017 Electronic Music Midwest Festival, the 2017 Atlantic Music Festival, the Electrobrass II Conference, the 2017 Society of Composers, Incorporated Region IV Conference, the 2016 NACUSA/SCI Snapshot Conference, and the 2016 Society of Composers, Incorporated National Conference among others. His choir music has been performed by the Academy of Voices of Minneapolis, Minnesota, the Dekalb Choral Guild of Atlanta, Georgia, and the Repertory Singers of the University of Georgia. As a recipient of a James E. Croft Grant for Young and Emerging Wind Band Composers, his wind ensemble works have been performed nationally.
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Christopher Williams is a violist specializing in the performance of new and innovative music. His debut solo album, Viola Voltage (2018), features electroacoustic works for solo viola and various electronic medias. He has performed with orchestras in Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, Indiana, and Alabama. He received his Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Georgia in 2018. He also earned his Master’s Degree in Music Performance from UGA in 2014. He was awarded Director’s Excellence Award from UGA in 2016 for his performances in numerous graduate chamber ensembles. He studied viola performance with Maggie Snyder, Idalynn Besser, Seanad Chang, Scott Rawls, Erika Eckert, and Rebecca Bull. Christopher is an active violin, viola, and cello teacher for the UGA Community Music School and also hosts sectionals and master classes throughout various student orchestras in Georgia.
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Later Event: November 9
Concert 2